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8 Ways to Wish Someone a Happy Eid in Arabic

8 Ways to Wish Someone a Happy Eid
Reading Time: 3 minutes

Millions around the world mark the end of Ramadan with the celebration of Eid al-Fitr. Here are 8 different greetings from around the Arabic-speaking world that you can use to wish someone a happy and prosperous Eid (and the common responses to such wishes).

1. Eid Mubarak (عيد مبارك) – Across the Arab world

This is perhaps the most common way to wish someone a happy Eid. It literally translates to, “[have a] blessed Eid”. In response, one could also say Eid mubarak (عيد مبارك) which means, “blessed Eid [to you too]”, Allah yebarek feek/i (الله يبارك فيك), which means “God bless you [too]”,  or simply, shukran (شكراً) meaning “thank you”.

2. Yen’ad alaikum bel-sahha wa al-saleme (ينعاد عليكم بالصحة والسلامة) – Levant 

This greeting is directed to a group of people and means: ‘‘May the next Eid find you in [good] health and wellness’’. It is used commonly in the Levant. As a response one would say: wa alaikum bel-sahha wa al-saleme (وعليكم و بالصحة والسلامة) meaning, ‘‘may health and wellness be upon you [too]’’.

3. Kol ‘am wa anta/i bikhair (كل عام وأنت بخير) – Levant 

With this expression you are saying: ‘‘I wish you goodness every year’’. Like the previous greeting, it is used popularly in the Levant. One would respond by saying: wa anta/i bikhair (وأنت بخير) which translates to ‘‘and goodness to you [too]’’.

4. Eid fitr saeed (عيد فطر سعيد) – Across the Arab world

This greeting is most apt for the upcoming Eid al-Fitr celebration. It literally means: “Happy Eid al-Fitr”. The common response to this would be: ‘alayna wa ‘alaik/i (علينا وعليك) meaning, “upon us and upon you”.

5. Eidkum mubarak wa inshallah min al-aydeen (
عيدكم مبارك وإن شاء الله من العايدين) – Iraq

This is a popular Eid salutation in Iraq. It means: “[Have a] blessed Eid and God willing, may you be among those who celebrate it over and over”.

6. Min al-aydeen (من العايدين) – Yemen

Similar to the Iraqi greeting, this expression from Yemen means: ‘‘May you be among those who celebrate Eid over and over’’. One would respond to it with min al-fayzeen (من الفايزين) which means, ‘‘may you be [counted] among those who are successful’’.

7. Eidkum mubarak wa asakum min uwwadah (عيدكم مبارك وعساكم من عواده) –  The Gulf region

This heartfelt expression means: ‘‘Have a blessed Eid and may you go on to witness many more Eids’’. In response one would say: Mubarak ‘alayna wa alaikum inshallah (مبارك علينا وعليكم إن شاء الله) meaning ‘‘God willing, blessings on us and you’’.

8. Kol sana wa anta/i tayeb/a (كل سنه وأنت/ه طيب/ه) – Egypt 

With the meaning of ‘‘I wish you goodness every year’’, this phrase is commonly used in the Egyptian Eid greetings (as well as birthday wishes). It is often followed by wa anta/i tayeb/a (وأنت طيب) and/or Eid saeed ‘alayna (عيد سعيد علينا)  as a response, meaning ‘‘and [wish] you goodness too’’ and ‘‘happy Eid to us [all]”, respectively.

Book a session, today, to learn more about these greetings and the various dialects of Arabic with NaTakallam’s native language tutors! Choose from Modern Standard Arabic and 7 dialects: Egyptian, Iraqi, Sudanese, Yemeni, and Levantine – Syrian, Palestinian, Lebanese.

To our language partners, learners, friends, supporters and all those celebrating, Eid Mubarak!

At NaTakallam, every language session contributes to the livelihoods of our skilled tutors from refugee/displaced backgrounds and their host communities.

 

 

Credits:
– Copywriting: Maria Thomas is a copywriter with NaTakallam. She is currently pursuing her doctoral studies in art history. In her spare time, she enjoys reading, powerlifting and going on hikes.
– Copyediting: Emmy Plaschy is a volunteer content writer and editor at NaTakallam. She currently works in communications in Switzerland. In her spare time, she enjoys polishing her Arabic skills, writing and gazing at the stars.
Proofreading support: Sally Wehbi is an Education Coordinator with NaTakallam. Her background is in education and event planning. In her free time, Sally enjoys spending time with family, seeking out adventures, and practising laughter yoga.
Content support 1: Abir Zahra is an Arabic Language Partner with NaTakallam from Lebanon. She has worked as a maths and science teacher for 4 years. More recently, she worked as an educator with Syrian refugee children. Abir enjoys travelling, shopping, and meeting new people.
Content support 2: Ahmed Aseem is an Arabic Language Partner with NaTakallam from Egypt. He is passionate about the Arabic language and culture, and enjoys helping others overcome language barriers. In his spare time, Ahmed loves to go fishing and hiking.
And 3 other Language Partners who would like to remain anonymous.

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