10 Common Misconceptions About Refugees

10 Common Misconceptions About Refugees | NaTakallam
Reading Time: 9 minutes

 


Myth 1: Most refugees restart their lives comfortably in new countries.

Fact: Less than 1% of refugees are resettled into new countries.

 

Resettlement is still a rare phenomenon, even though millions are eligible. In 2020, resettlement numbers hit a record low in the past two decades, according to a UNHCR report. Even though the US increased their refugee ceiling in 2021 to 62,500, a total of only 11,411 were resettled in the fiscal year – a mere 18% of the announced target. Even if successful, the resettlement process often takes years, and the journey of starting life anew in a foreign country can be extremely hard, especially in the face of new legal and educational systems, foreign languages, and cultural norms. 

NaTakallam works with skilled refugees who are often stuck in limbo, cut off from local labor markets, in camps or other transit circumstances. Therefore, each language session with NaTakallam makes important and meaningful contributions to their livelihoods and overall sense of belonging.

Sources: UN, UNHCR (Report), UNHCR (Data finder), Immigration Forum.

 

 


Myth 2: Most displaced persons flee to the US, Europe and Australia
.


Fact: 76% of displaced persons are hosted in developing countries.

 

Contrary to common belief and misleading headlines, only a small fraction of resettled refugees are hosted in developed countries of the West. From the 108.4 million forcibly displaced people today, the US admitted just over 25,000 refugees in 2022, using only 20% of the admissions target set by the Biden administration. In 2022, the EU resettled only 16,695 refugees despite promising to resettle more than 20,000 refugees. Most are forced into limbo states, with no legal residency or work status. 

The majority of displaced persons that NaTakallam works with have fled to neighboring developing countries. As of mid-2022, the leading host countries include Turkey (3.6 million refugees), Iran (3.4 million), Colombia (2.5 million), Germany (2.1 million) and Pakistan (1.7 million). Together, they accommodate 38% of the global refugee population.

Sources: UNHCR, Amnesty, Immigration Forum, CBC News, International Rescue Committee

 


Myth 3: Most refugees are adults.

 

Fact: Over 40% of refugees are under 18.


Not all refugees are adults. According to the UNHCR, an estimated 36.5 million of the world’s 100 million displaced people are under the age of 18. Furthermore, an estimated 12.5 million of the 27.1 million refugees are child refugees. Between 2018 and 2020, an average of between 290,000 and 340,000 children were born into a refugee life per year. Today, there are over 1 million children in the world who were born as refugees.

This demographic breakdown holds true for almost every regional crisis. Though children make up about a third of the global population, they constitute 50% of the world’s refugees. This dynamic is a significant concern, as contemporary child migration is often inhumane, unregulated, and dangerous. Moreover, an additional obstacle for refugee children seeking asylum is the fact that many of them go through this process without adult support. 

Source(s): UNHCR, UNICEF, Concern USA, UN News

 


Myth 4: Many refugees have smartphones so they must be well off.

 

Fact: Smartphones are a lifeline for refugees, not a luxury.

 

For refugees, smartphones provide access to essential and potentially life-saving information. Smartphones are used to find food, shelter, and assistance, navigate new areas, communicate with loved ones, and even earn a living through virtual work. Refugees often spend up to a third of their disposable income to afford connectivity and opportunities that come with a smartphone, according to Amnesty International.

In the era of what some have dubbed “the connected refugee,” NaTakallam provides opportunities for refugees to work as online language tutors, interpreters, and translators for users worldwide. 

Sources: UNHCR, Forbes, GSMA, Amnesty 

 

 

 

Myth 5: Most refugees live in camps.


Fact: Nearly 80% of refugees live in urban areas.

 

 Contrary to the frequent images of sprawling refugee camps in the media, almost 80% of refugees live in urban areas. This has presented a new set of challenges: resources are often less concentrated and humanitarian assistance is less plentiful, meaning that individuals can miss vital information and aid more easily.

NaTakallam works with displaced persons in both urban areas and refugee camps to ensure no one is marginalized due to their current circumstances. We leverage technology in a way that ensures accessibility for all users. 

Sources: UN Refugees, UNHCR, The Brookings Institute 

 

 


Myth 6: Refugee influxes ruin economies and communities.


Fact: Studies show that refugees can have positive fiscal and social impacts.

 

The notion that admitting refugees will ruin a host country’s economy is rooted in false economic beliefs. Over time, it has been shown that refugees actually add more value to the economy than the initial cost of resettlement – if they are granted the right to work legally. Moreover, studies show that low-skilled foreign workers and low-skilled domestic workers tend to complement each other rather than compete. In the US, refugees add billions to the economy, and experts assert that they will play a vital role in helping economies recover after the pandemic.

What is more, contrary to political narratives, studies consistently show that refugees are less likely to commit crimes, engage in “antisocial” behavior, or be arrested. In fact, higher immigration is generally associated with much lower crime rates. 

Many of NaTakallam’s displaced tutors are barred from local employment due to legal restrictions – leaving them vulnerable to the black market and unsafe work. NaTakallam allows refugees to make an income legitimately and safely, regardless of their location.

Sources: Immigration Forum, University of Oxford, Business Insider, Economic Research Forum, Global Citizen

 

 


Myth 7: Most refugees are from the MENA region.

 

Fact: The largest groups of refugees are from Ukraine, Syria and Afghanistan

 

While the news is often inundated with talk about refugees from the Middle East and North Africa region, over 72% of refugees arriving in the United States are actually not from the MENA region. As of 2022, the conflict and humanitarian crisis in Ukraine has forced more than 8.2 million people to flee the country with 5.9 million internally displaced. Followed by 5.4 million Syrian refugees hosted within the MENA region, with over 6.8 million internally displaced, and 5.2 million refugees from Afghanistan, of which 47% are children, and 3.3 million internally displaced. Furthermore, countries such as Venezuela, Burkina Faso, Myanmar, and Eritrea, among many more, are grappling with conflict and displacement issues, yet are frequently overlooked.

Sources: UNHCR, UNHCR Syria, UNHCR Afghanistan, UNHCR Ukraine, Statista, NRC

 

 


Myth 8: Refugees never return home to their native countries.

 

Fact: Most refugees would prefer to go home, and many do.

 

Popular narratives paint refugees as “economic migrants” who come to profit from the opportunities of more developed countries and never return to their home countries. This is a misconception. According to various surveys done across the world, most refugees are understandably reluctant to go home when the situation remains unsafe. However, from a sample survey of 1,100 displaced Syrians, an overwhelming majority, around 73%, say they would return home if the conditions were right.

Another report showed that in 2019 alone, 46,500 refugees voluntarily returned to the Central African Republic. What refugees seek is physical safety, dependable work, and sustainable housing, and the majority agree that if this were available in their home country, they would return. NaTakallam enables refugees to have reliable, consistent work as language tutors and translators in Arabic, Armenian, English, French, Kurdish, Persian, Russian, Spanish, Ukrainian and more.

Sources: UN refugee statistics, Washington Post, Relief Web, The National, UNHCR report

 

 


Myth 9: Refugees don’t make for good employees.

 

Fact: Refugees can be a long-term economic advantage for companies.

 

Employers say it best: when it comes to refugees, “they come to work and get the job done.” Research from the Fiscal Policy Institute (FPI) in 2018 highlights that in addition to being hardworking, refugees often stay with their employers for longer and speak a foreign language – a highly desirable skill for any global company. 

Furthermore, in a Tent Partnership for Refugees report (also backed by the FPI), many businesses that hired refugees stated that they were among their most dedicated workers. Employee turnover rates were much lower among refugee employees than in the general population – thus, saving businesses money. 

Sources: UN, Fiscal Policy Institute, Business Insider, Tent Partnership for Refugees.

 

 


Myth 10: “There’s nothing I can do to help refugees.”

 

Fact: Each person can make a difference in supporting refugees.

 

Everyone can do something. Whether it is welcoming refugees into your own community, raising awareness about the cause, or supporting refugee-centered organizations, you have the power to make an impact beyond donations.

And if you are looking to support refugee livelihoods directly, amidst the fastest-growing displacement crisis of our time, consider bringing NaTakallam into your home, classroom, or office setting for your language-learning, cultural exchange, or translation needs. Change a life, one refugee at a time.

 

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